Author: Cuisine (Cuisine Contributor1)

Recipe

GUACAMOLE

When I was a child, I remember my dad loved to eat guacamole and chicharron rolled up in a taco. Now, of course, guacamole is everywhere, most commonly eaten as a dip with tortilla chips. It’s actually extremely easy to make; it just depends on the avocados you use. In Mexico, we are lucky enough to have a huge variety of avocados at our disposal, but outside of the country there is less choice. I recommend using hass or fuerte avocados, as they are large, creamy and easy to peel.


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Recipe

TORTILLAS

There is no doubt that handmade tortillas are far superior to store-bought versions, plus they are fun to make. They also enable you to use yellow, white or blue masa flour. Even though nixtamal (the process of soaking and cooking corn in limewater) is the traditional and most authentic way to make masa, it’s very labour-intensive. Store-bought masa is absolutely fine to use and the results are pretty much the same. You will need a tortilla press to make tortillas. You can easily pick one up at your local Latin American supermarket or online. Don’t pre-roll the masa dough into balls, as they will dry up, causing the tortillas to crack. If you are not eating the tortillas straight away, make sure you place them in a tortilla warmer. Keep in mind that handmade tortillas are meant to be eaten as you make them.


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SALSA ROJA (RED SALSA)

Salsa roja can be served fresh or cooked. I prefer the fresh version, but I recommend eating it on the day it’s made, as the tomatoes are delicate and start to collapse into a liquidy mess after a few hours. Chillies de árbol and pequin chillies are very hot, but you can add more if you prefer an even spicier salsa.


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Recipe

FLAUTAS (ROLLED DEEP-FRIED TACOS)

Flautas are filled and rolled tortillas which are deep-fried and served with a variety of toppings. They’re a great way to use up left-over chicken, beef, lamb or veggies, but the most popular filling is always barbacoa. Make a double batch of the lamb described in the tacos de barbacoa recipe and use the leftovers to make these delicious fried tacos.


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TACOS DE BARBACOA (SLOW-COOKED LAMB TACOS)

Tacos de barbacoa is an ancestral dish that uses an earth oven to slow-cook a whole lamb wrapped in agave leaves. Traditionally served with a consommé, there would always be enough food to feed the whole neighbourhood. In the cities, barbacoa stalls are particularly busy on weekend mornings when Mexicans are looking for a good hangover cure! It’s pretty hard to find agave leaves outside of Mexico, so I’ve used banana leaves here instead and even though the flavour is not quite the same, you won’t be disappointed with the result.


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Recipe

PAMBAZOS CON PAPAS Y CHORIZO (POTATO & CHORIZO PAMBAZOS)

It’s hard for me to describe a pambazo without gushing as it’s my favourite garnacha (little bite) of all time! There is something so special about the crusty bolillos (bread rolls) soaked in guajillo sauce and filled with chorizo. I used to eat pambazos at least once a week while hanging out with friends in Mexico City. It was the first garnacha I learned to make and I’ll never forget burning my fingertips trying to flip it over and watching the sizzling lard splattering over my hands in red guajillo dots. You might need a couple of napkins as this dish is super messy!


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Recipe

MOLOTES (FRIED MASA POCKETS)

This recipe comes from my mother’s family. I remember visiting my relatives in a town called Agua Fria and my aunt Luz making molotes for all of us. During my last visit to Mexico I finally learned how to make them, and now I get to share the recipe in this book. I recommend using white or yellow masa flour as the contact with the hot oil brings out the flavour of the masa.


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