Author: Cuisine (Cuisine Contributor1)

Recipe

GIN-CURED BEEF, QUINOA & PEA SHOOTS, TURNIP & RADISH CONFIT

In theory, this recipe is simple enough, but you can see why it is often left to restaurants – once you have bought and cured your expensive piece of beef fillet, it isn’t easy to cut into wafer-thin slices without it looking like you took a chainsaw to it. You can avoid this either by briefly freezing the meat, wrapped in cling film, for about 30 minutes before slicing it, or taking it straight from the fridge, cutting slices the thickness of a one-dollar coin and then batting the meat out between two sheets of cling film.

CORIANDER OIL

Coriander is the second most commonly used botanical after juniper in the world of gin, although its contribution is usually nuanced. Try adding a few coriander sprigs along with a chunk of cucumber to your next gin and tonic.

QUINOA & PEA SHOOTS
The secret to great quinoa is to use twice as much water as there is quinoa.

TURNIP & RADISH CONFIT
This isn’t strictly a confit, but ‘boiled turnips’ doesn’t sound anywhere near as nice. Tokyo turnips have none of the sharp, bitter bite found in their larger cousins.

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IT TAKES A VILLAGE

The first dust of winter speckling the hills near Ōamaru is a cue to cosy-up the menu at Cucina, the Tees St restaurant of Pablo and Yanina Tacchini. “When the mountains are all snowy, we need to put soup back on the menu,” says Yanina. “It’s crazy; suddenly all the tourists are here and everyone wants soup.”

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GAME ON

In the 1970s, deer farming was in its infancy and not for the faint-hearted. Those involved were a hardy lot, diving fearlessly out of hovering helicopters to tackle wild beasts, once considered pests, for transport to the farm.

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MEAT & GREET

Increasingly, the New Zealand meat industry is under fire, despite the fact that, by even the most conservative estimate, 85 per cent of New Zealanders still eat meat – and so many benefit from an economy that continues to depend on it. The sector is our second-largest merchandise exporter, generating $12 billion in income per year and contributing $3,300 annually to every New Zealand household.