Recipe Category: Emma Galloway

Recipe

EGGPLANT, LEMON & BAY LEAF SOUVLAKI WITH HERB PILAF & TZATZIKI

Tender garlicky eggplant cooked alongside lemon and bay leaf makes for a lovely plant-based alternative to the more usual fish or chicken. I like to colour them in a pan before finishing off in the oven to ensure the eggplant is meltingly soft. Leave the bay leaves out if you can’t source fresh ones as dried won’t be the same here. If you’re a fried-cheese fan, you could add cubes of haloumi along with the eggplant.

Recipe

HALOUMI BAKED IN VINE LEAVES WITH TOMATO SALAD

Cheese and tomato is one of the finest pairings ever. Here I’ve upped the ante a little by wrapping the haloumi in vine leaves before baking until soft. You can find vine leaves preserved in brine at specialty food stores or online (make dolmades with any leftovers). To use fresh vine leaves, choose only new-season, fresh leaves as older ones are too tough. To prepare, trim the stalks off and cook in boiling water for 5 minutes before draining and rinsing in cold water. Dried oregano can be used in place of the fresh oregano in the salad if that’s what you have, oregano being the one herb I find is just as good dried as fresh.

Recipe

BUCKWHEAT SALAD WITH WHIPPED FENNEL FETA

Although buckwheat is not an overly common ingredient in Greek food, it acts as the perfect high-protein base for this lemon and herb-kissed salad. You’ll find whole raw buckwheat at selected supermarkets or health-food stores.
For salads like this, where you don’t want excess moisture, I like to scrape the seeds from the cucumber using a teaspoon first. It might seem pedantic but it’s well worth the extra few minutes of prep, and I simply eat the scraped seeds as a little pre-meal snack, so there’s no food waste either.

Recipe

SPINACH, CRISPY CHICKPEA & FRIED PANEER SALAD WITH TOASTED CUMIN & LIME DRESSING

This salad is a meal in itself and while it’s ideally eaten immediately after frying the paneer – while it’s still crispy on the outside and soft in the middle – it’s still nice eaten at room temperature or even re-heated the following day if you find yourself with leftovers (see my note below). Lemon juice can be used in place of lime juice, if preferred.

Recipe

TEMPEH CURRY – RENDANG TEMPE

While rendang curry is more commonly associated with Malaysian cooking nowadays, it’s said to have originated in Indonesia. This dry curry is more often than not made with beef, but I’ve come up with a vegan version using protein-rich tempeh instead. Tempeh is a traditional Indonesian soy product that’s now readily available throughout New Zealand at supermarkets and health food stores. Being fermented, it’s easier for the body to digest than other soy products and provides good amounts of protein, calcium and prebiotics. This is a rich curry, so a little goes a long way. It can easily be halved to feed fewer people. I suggest serving it with a bright crunchy salad dressed with a lime-based dressing, to cut through some of that richness.

Recipe

SWEET & SOUR TEMPEH – KERING TEMPE

There are many different versions of this dish throughout Indonesia depending on where it’s made and by whom, but it’s most commonly eaten throughout Java. It also happens to be one of my favourite ways to enjoy tempeh. After frying the tempeh until crisp and golden, it’s stirred through the aromatics and sauce and cooked until lusciously sticky. Best eaten straight from the pan with a bowl of plain jasmine rice.

Makrut lime leaves are more commonly known as kaffir lime leaves. Research is inconclusive as to whether the name was originally used in a racist manner, but the word ‘kaffir’ is a derogatory name in many countries, so I’d rather use the southeast Asian name from where the limes originate. Any excess can be frozen and used straight from the freezer.

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