Recipe Category: Ginny Grant

Recipe

LEEK & MUSHROOM RAGU

I never get tired of the combination of sweet and silky leeks with the earthiness of mushrooms. I like to use a mix of mushrooms, including some dried for texture and a deeper flavour (porcini are wonderful, shiitake or other dried mushrooms are also suitable). Here I’ve served it with polenta, but it is also delicious tossed through pappardelle, on toast or over mashed potato or kūmara. Sometimes, too, this combination will find its way into a soup with a vegetarian broth and some sturdy ingredients such lentils, buckwheat or barley for a dose of life-affirming goodness.

I like polenta softer and wetter than most directions allow for. The usual suggestion is for a ratio of 1:4 polenta to liquid, but I tend to aim for a 1:5 or 1:6 ratio. Usually I’d add butter to finish, but sometimes if I have a little cream or other dairy that needs using up then it will end up in here. Herbs are always good to add, too, right at the end so that they keep their vibrant colour.

Recipe

RED CAPSICUM, RED LENTIL & CHICKEN CURRY WITH TAMARIND SYRUP

Yes, you could do this with chicken pieces, but usually I prefer to buy a whole bird, mostly because I prefer the skin on the chicken, but also so I can make a stock with the backbone. I’ve kept this mild flavoured but feel free to add chilli to the mix or to serve alongside at the end. Ring seasonal changes by changing the vegetables; in place of the capsicums try adding silverbeet or spinach near the end of cooking, or kūmara or pumpkin (you might need to add extra chicken stock). This curry can be frozen.

Recipe

POTATO GNOCCHI WITH BUTTERCUP PURÉE, BRUSSELS SPROUTS & PANCETTA

I get why people don’t want to make gnocchi: it does take a long time to make, and the vagueness of many recipes puts people off. But like most things, the more you make it the easier it gets and you get a feel for how the dough should co-operate. However, if it does discourage you, make this instead with bought gnocchi, as it really is a lovely combination of flavours.

Good gnocchi relies on the dryness of the potato which can be variable depending on the time of the season and where they were grown. I tend to use Agria here, but Ilam Hardy, Fianna or Red Rascal should work well. I bake the potatoes rather than steam, microwave or boil as it helps to reduce the amount of moisture. The egg yolk is optional – it does make the mixture more stable to work, but the resulting gnocchi can be a little sturdier than those made without it. It’s important, too, not to overwork the dough. I usually start off with the minimum of flour then add more as necessary. I make a large batch that’s more than what you will need for one meal, but I free-flow freeze the rest for a meal at a later point.

Recipe

CHARGRILLED FENNEL SLAW BRUSCHETTA WITH OYSTER MAYONNAISE

Normally when I make mayonnaise I prefer to use olive oil, but here the delicacy of the oysters is lost if using strongly flavoured oil. I’ve become a huge fan of rapeseed oil, locally grown and produced by The Good Oil, and that is what I have used here. It’s not necessary to use an egg yolk here to emulsify the mayonnaise but it does remove the risk of it splitting. Feel free to top the bruschetta with more oysters as I have done.

Recipe

NEW POTATO, CHOPPED CURRIED EGG, OLIVE & ANCHOVY BRUSCHETTA

Old-school curried eggs seem to be having a come-back; I’ve been to a few parties recently where they were served and they disappeared in a flash. They are even better with the addition of a few extras, making this more of a swanky breakfast in a mobile form. And to those of you who think that potato and bread is a carb overload, I just say ‘shush’.

Recipe

PICKLED GREEN TOMATOES, ’NDUJA & SMOKED KAHAWAI BRUSCHETTA

The spicy, spreadable Calabrian salami ’nduja (pronounced en-DOO-ya) is rightly having a moment in the sun; its bright red colouring – thanks to paprika – is matched by the intensity of the spicy chilli. Think of it as a spicy chorizo that is ready to eat as it is, but hotter. Mellowed out here by the green tomato pickle and the smoked fish, it is decidedly moreish. It can be found in some speciality food stores; I got mine from the Grey Lynn Butcher.

Recipe

COFFEE MASCARPONE, DATE SYRUP, BERRIES & ALMOND BRIOCHE

Dessert (or breakfast) doesn’t come any simpler than this. Date syrup can be found in some supermarkets (in the sugars section) but if unavailable try using either maple or rice syrup instead. Normally I loathe instant coffee but Coffee Supreme’s freeze-dried instant coffee is superb to use here. The berries can be changed to what you have available; blackberries and strawberries, the last of the stone fruits and even sliced bananas would also be excellent.

Recipe

SWEET AND SOUR PUMPKIN, TOUM & PROSCIUTTO BRUSCHETTA

Butternut is one of my favourite pumpkins, partly because it is easy to peel but also I find the shape and size appealing, and the flavour delicate. Here I’ve paired it with toum – the Lebanese version of aioli that is not for the faint hearted – and some sweet and nutty prosciutto, but feel free to omit this if you wish.

FOR THE TOUM
It’s hard to make this in small amounts. I use a mortar and pestle to mash the garlic then transfer either to a bowl and whisk by hand or use a stick blender to emulsify the ingredients. It will keep refrigerated for up to a month. Don’t use pre-crushed or pre-peeled garlic; it will just be a bitter mess. And on that note, if the cloves have green germs, remove them for the same reason. Use olive oil for a stronger flavour, rapeseed oil for a more mellow toum.

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