Ingredients

1 tablespoon gochugaru (Korean chilli pepper powder)
1 tablespoon sumac
1 orange, zested and juiced (4 tablespoons of juice)
3 garlic cloves, finely grated
25g fresh ginger, peeled, finely grated
1 teaspoon black sesame seeds
2 teaspoons golden caster sugar
3 tablespoons salt (not iodised)
4 tablespoons water, preferably filtered
400g rhubarb, trimmed, cut on the diagonal into 3mm slices (380g net weight)
fennel bulb, trimmed, halved, shaved into 1mm slices (340g net weight)
250g carrots, peeled and shaved into 2mm coins (250g net weight)
100g spring onions, trimmed, cut on the diagonal into 3mm slices (80g net weight)

This adaptation of a traditional kimchi uses sharp, tangy rhubarb as a great vehicle for the flavours in this fermented pickle. If you have less of the rhubarb, fennel or carrots, that’s okay – any combination will work as long as the combined weight of the vegetables stays the same as stated in the recipe.

Instructions

1.Put the gochugaru, sumac, orange zest and juice, garlic, ginger, sesame seeds, caster sugar, salt and water into a large mixing bowl. Stir to create a paste.
2.Add the rhubarb, fennel, carrots and spring onions and, with gloved hands, gently stir and then massage everything together.
3.Cover the mixing bowl with a clean tea towel and leave to stand at room temperature for about 2 hours; this allows the vegetables to marinate in the paste and release some of their juices.
4.Transfer to a sterilised preserving jar or similar, pressing down to ensure the veges are submerged in the liquid.
5.Seal the jar with a lid and place in a dark cupboard.
6.Check the kimchi once a day using a clean spoon to press the veges down into the liquid.
7.Once it is tangy enough and to your liking (this could take 2-5 days), move the jar to the fridge.
8.The longer you leave it, the more the sour, tangy notes will come out.
9.Once completely chilled, it is ready to use.

Recipes & food styling Russell Holder / Photography Manja Wachsmuth

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