Recipe Category: Issue 188

Recipe

FRY BREAD WITH PASSIONFRUIT & HONEY

Fry breads are one of the simplest of breads and are found worldwide, from the youtiao of China, bannock of Scotland, or sopadillas of Mexico and South America. Some may be yeasted or include a raising agent, but they all use basic ingredients and are prepared with a minimum of fuss. This recipe is based on a fairly standard ratio for fry breads, but enriched with a little extra butter. Here I’ve made them into doughnuts with simple passionfruit and honey syrup. I used a delicate beechwood honey for the syrup and frozen passionfruit pulp, but do use fresh passionfruit if available. Each passionfruit has approximately 2 tablespoons pulp. These are best eaten on the day they are made.

Recipe

FRIED TURNIP-CAKE BAO

Turnip cake (law bok gow) or more accurately radish cake, is a popular component at yum cha venues and is especially popular at Chinese New Year. Normally it would have dried shrimp and/or Chinese sausage added to the mix. Steamed then fried and served with a chilli sauce or hoisin-based sauce and eaten as is, it’s a deliciously simple dish. I thought it would be a brilliant component for a vegetarian bao.

Recipe

STEAMED TUATUA WITH CREME FRAICHE CURRY SAUCE

Mouclade is a famous – and somewhat surprising – dish from Brittany, in which mussels are first steamed then served with a lightly curried sauce. Of course, this combination works well with other shellfish too, and I especially like it with bigger tuatua.

Serve with crusty baguette as it would be in France, or you could use other types of bread; naan would be great. For more of a main course, spoon the shellfish and sauce over grilled fish and kumara puree or rice.

Recipe

TUATUA FRITTERS WITH SEAWEED MAYONNAISE

With tuatua there is nothing nicer than mixing the chopped meat with a simple batter, and frying. Here I have stretched the mix further with cabbage and potato. I use Lauraine Jacobs’ method of freezing the fresh tuatua in their shells so they only get cooked once, or use Cloudy Bay tuatua that are easy to shuck. If time is short mix the seaweed, lemon and togarashi seasoning into good-quality mayo to serve.

Recipe

HOT PIPI & TOFU SOUP

"A new take on Korean hot tofu soup that uses pipi with silky soft tofu – served bubbling hot in cast-iron bowls, it’s light and refreshing."

Korean hot tofu soup can be made with a meat base but I have based this version on my sister Meredith’s favourite soup – from the long-gone Korean restaurant at Auckland’s Mercury Plaza – which included little clams. The egg is added at the last minute and thickens the soup as you stir it through. If you are feeling hungry, double the quantity of tofu.

Recipe

CONFIT CHICKEN

Traditionally the confit process was a way of preserving meat; the meat was salted then poached in fat enabling it to be stored long term. We mostly associate duck or goose with the confit method, however the process is adaptable; fish and chicken also work well, especially when the confit uses oil. The cooked chicken can keep in the oil for up to a week, and the oil can be reused for other dishes.

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